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of religion, identity and relationship, and we'll be looking at that. i wanted to go to a roll-in, though, that we didn't get which is one of the more interesting ones we have at glide memorial methodist church out in san francisco. and this is, in a way, i think a little synchronicity here. maybe it's good we didn't get it in the last class because it's a good way to prompt some of the questions you might have about some of those key class themes we went over in our interview with cecil williams. now, this was quite a shoot. it's a fantastic church out in san francisco, and reverend williams said some amazing things about religion on this. but for the crew, what made the day, actually, it was my birthday - i went to church on my birthday when we did this shoot, and it was chaos. i mean, thousands of people around, nobody knew where we were supposed to go, we're sitting down with all our equipment like some rock stars on a battle of the bands, hanging around there, just waiting for stuff to happen. and all of a sudden, this movie star walks in - what's her name? anybody know her? tall? se
to come together and to come up with a reasonable solution here that would not infringe on a religion and also keep women protected and you had those i guess attempting to enflame this as a war on religion and the other things that were accused. when we talked with you and when you became a household name at the beginning of this story. >> yeah. this is just another step in what the administration has said that they wanted to do, which you're exactly right. to find a path forward to cover health care without infringing on a potential concern. and i think what's important to note is some of the folks continuing to object to this policy are actually worried about employer who is are private companies not religiously affiliated employers in any way but the boss has a particular religious concern and they want to deny their employees particular types of health care. if you take a step back and think about that, that's you work at a restaurant, you work at a store and your boss is able to deny you leukemia coverage or blood transfusions or any number of medical concerns someone might have
in the battle with some religion non-profit organizations over the requirement they offer birth control coverage in their health insurance packages. while today's shift is significant, it also leaves out a big group that is also suing the government. chief washington correspondent james rosen tells us what triggered the change. >> under the new rules proposed by health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius non-profit religious employers will be able to opt out of the obamacare mandate of female contraceptive in the healthcare plan. instead insurers will be required to provide coverage, including standard birth control and items like the morning after pill. the white house says the modifications meet president obama's overarching goals. >> we had to ensure the women have access to preventative services like contraception. the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> catholic league bill donahue held the announcement as a sign of good will toward the catholic community. because the private sector firms with religious objections are not covered by the proposal and many insurance firms ar
they are discriminating against other religions. wait until you hear what the school wants to do with them. >> with super bowl sunday days away we have the school and gadgets and game that will help you score big with your next party. first on this day in history back in 1968 the king elvis became a father. elvis' wife priscilla gave birth. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! ♪ wow. [ buzz ] delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? bee happy. bee healthy. with clusters of flakes and o's. oh, ho ho... it's the honey sweetness. i...i mean, you...love. i>> good morning to you. welcome to "fox & friends first". it is friday. you have made it through the workweek. congratulations. it is time for the top 5@5:30. we begin with a fox news alert. it is a third day of the tense hostage negotiation in the state of alabama. a man holding a 5-year-old boy in an under ground bunker. cops haven't officially released the man's name yet but he is known to stay in
at this and say, what civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not long ago i was up at a place called chimney rock in southwest colorado. and it's over 8,000 feet. and you are up at the southern end ftd rocky mountains and there is this scarp of rock that rises up probably about a thousand feet out of a valley floor and right at the tip of this scarp there are two twin towers of rock. if you get to a certain place on top of this very narrow butte, you can see between these twin towers and there happens to be a great house built between these two towers and every 18.6 years when the moon goes into its northernmost point on the horizon, it rises between those two towers. i was there at the beginning of the last 18.6 year cycle and we stood up there, probably 20 of us, researchers, forest service people, all gathered at the same spot with cameras and huddled -- it was late december at 8,0
's almost a religion. rhea: there are so many shoes here. so i'm gonna pick them up and you tell us what we have here. gay: okay, that is a victorian shoe. and you can see the fancy little spool heel, and a lot of the victorian shoes were very pointy. and then you would use your button hook to fasten your button right here. rhea: what about this? gay: okay, that is quite the fancy shoe. that's from about 1917. that's an edwardian shoe. and you can see that they were still using buttons. and the welt is striped, it's got your patent and your kidskin here; you got your wooden stacked heel in the back. it's just got everything. rhea: this is beautiful. i think this is a really really elegant shoe. gay: and that is a '20s shoe. you can see all the deco styling on it. and one of the nicer things they did, that they're not doing yet is this gorgeous little tassel. rhea: here's our next one. gay: and that's a '30s shoe. they started getting thicker heels in the '30s, a little bit more girly, little bit less of the deco look. and that is what we call a "south beach sky high," and
amendment rights by forcing them to go against the religion. today press second tear jay carney set the white house believes this new accommodate satisfies everyone's best interests. >> we had to ensure that women have access to preventive services, lycra ception, and that the picy also respects religious beliefs. those guidelines action those criteria having followed, and as part of that process, there's more comments that will be taken on it. >> reporter: women's health groups have come out in support of this new policy. so has a left-leaning catholic group, but there are many groups that staunchly oppose anything but a repeal. the policy is under a 60-day public comment period. then it is going to take effect in august. reporting live on capitol hill, i'm danielle leigh, news4. >>> the turkish government says an outlawed leftist group is to blame for a deadly suicide bombing. several bistanders were injured in the blast. white house officials say the bombing was was a trifl act. >>> she's been the public face of the united states in 112 countries. today is hillary clinton's last
. >> caller: that is not true. >> why don't you like homosexuals for religion reasons? >> caller: no i'm against homosexuality because of what happens when young boys get molested -- >> but that is pedophilia. >> caller: but you can also say that -- okay let's say a boy is 15 years old, and a 60 year old man from manbla wants to have sex with him -- >> man bla has about ten members nationwide. >> why should we not let you around young girls? >> because i'm not sick. >> i see. >> caller: i'm not saying all homosexuals are going to molest young boys. >> stephanie: oh, thank you. >> i think chris just poked a hole in your logic? >> these men are attracted to the same sex -- >> stephanie: are you saying that all pedophiles are gay? >> caller: no any man that molests a young boy is gay. he may not admit it because he is attracted to the male genitalia -- >> you are attracted to female genitalia, so why should we let you around young girls? >> caller: look there's plenty of men that go after young girls -- >> sir -- >> caller: i'm saying you should try to avoid the s
on religion. it is dropping a controversial health care form provision requiring religiously affiliated provision to cover cont contraceptions as part of the plans. jessica yellin is joining us with detalils. what is the latest then front, jessica? >> hi, wolf. this policy is meant to help those organizations like catholic universities that offer their own insurance policies, and self-insure, but object on moral grounds to offer contraception. does the policy go far enough? the jury is still out. >> medals of science -- >> reporter: obama administration officials say that proposed guidelines would ensure that women get contraception for free, and no objecting religious oorganization would have to pay for it, and a seemingly perfect compromise. >> we had to ensure that women have access to preventive services like contraception, and that the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> the policy would allow a self-insured organization like a catholic university to opt-out of providing birth control, and another insurance company would give employees birth control for free. >> this clarifi
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agree to those values and the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up to them. it's not always easy in the have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or to penicillin continue to stand up for them. on the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest from economic interest in moral interest and we have to continue to do that. but as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever, more agile and wish i had do that. for example are adtran, -- there are those who estimate that maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. but we try to do is say briefly mention is to get in there with them, undermine them and we've got them. it is something i did quite well in the cold war. the wife done this job, the more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some mono
of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values in the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up for them. it's not always easy and we have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or did, but will continue to stand up for them. and the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest, economic interests in more interests and we have to continue to do that. but then as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world that today requires us to be more clever, more agile and were trying to do that. for example, countering violent extremism, does this to me there are maybe 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and messaging today and are not and what we try to do is to get in there with him, to undermine non-and to rebut them. to dissent than we did quite well in the cold war. the more i've done this job, the more i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. no, we don't have some monolithic communist soviet union. but we
of religion with tower of babel, we know that language is essential to having an economy and country that stays together. this is a public school and the language used by the government of the united states most often is tkpwhreurb, english and these kids should be reciting the pledge of allegiance in english. >>gretchen: liz? >> i understand what you're saying. but i also believe if the children are speaking other languages, they should be allowed to say the pledge of allegiance in their languages. we live in a melting pot here in the united states where there are many different cultures and children speak many different languages and i feel they should be allowed to say the pledge of allegiance in their language if that's something they choose to do. >>gretchen: the thing for me, ladies, i guess i break it down on to what they were actually reciting. if they were reciting a nursery rhyme, then i don't think we'd be having this discussion. they were reciting the pledge of allegiance, which is our patriotic pledge to this country. and in fact, the immigration debate on capitol hill r
and pop really got religion now? >> i think the answer to that is no. january is seasonally a very good month, as halls been with the year-end reinvestment and pension contributions, has been a very good month for mutual funds. it's better than it was in the summer and autumn and winter. just last year. and so it's not the big pop that one would think you'd get. i, for one, think that's good. you know, when mutual fund investors pile into equities, it's usually a very negative sign for the market. so something like the dow going 14,000, i can contain my enthusiasm about that. it doesn't mean very much. >> and a lot of people have pointed out some of the records that we broke this month -- or i should say january, sort of were a reminder of the last time we set those records, which not too happy days were soon to follow, jack. >> well, yeah, you're right about that. it's even more dramatic if you go beyond the dow which has its advantages, and great limits. you go to the nasdaq, and that index is around 4,700 at its high in 2000. and now it's -- you tell me, 3,200 maybe. it's still fully
for your race or your tribe or your religion or your ideology or your region, whatever, your industry, these days, policy, politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics, and especially policy, will stand for something bigger, something broader, like the public interest, like freedom and justice, the ideals of the declaration of independence and constitution and the pledge of allegiance. and ideally we hope in washington that that's what think tanks do, that think tanks are separate from abstracted from the day-to-day struggles for either political power or special interest benefits from public policy. and, obviously, there are some who do that better than others but in the platonic ideal of the think tank is one committed to the public interest and even though we may disagree about what the public interest is. some think tanks insist they don't have an ideology, and worldview of perspective, a political philosophy. they are just about analyzing and seeing what works. i'm all in favor of analyzing things and seeing what works, but to d
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not have an up-to-date broadcast
are going to be the ones running this at the end. >> she is going to drug you what america's religion which is democracy and everyone in america loves democracy. on a grant that. i plead guilty to taking that. >> and i am right there with you but this is not about -- there is much more going on here to get anybody that knows the middle east knows that the borders were drawn around people that don't necessarily want to live together. we have seen this in israel, palestinians and jews do not want to live together. now, we could say let's have democracy and have a one state solution. joost not want a one-stop solution and palestinians do not want a one-stop solution. it's not about the democracy in palestine and israel and its about the democracy in iraq. we said was going to make democracy and cast the sunni is down. they were not. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, the government, the education system and that is what is going to have been anybody that thinks that when the takeover and syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions into the next stat
when i talk about freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not ha
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)